Louis Vuitton pairs with Jeff Koons for the Masters Collection

Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier
Louis Vuitton, Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Ca. Photo Romi Cortier

Louis Vuitton has paired up with world renowned artist Jeff Koons to create a line of handbags focusing on old world art masters such as Monet, Gauguin, Manet, Turner and Boucher.  I only discovered this a couple of nights ago while strolling down Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills. I’m not trying to be bougie… it’s just that I live a few blocks away and it’s so much fun to take in the holiday decorations. It’s free, fun, fantastic and often inspiring to see the holiday window displays.  Plus this year they’ve brought back the Baccarat Chandeliers that are only hung above  the street during some  Christmas seasons, not all. There’s also a little piped in holiday music, and plenty of areas for photo ops  with the hashtag #OnlyOnRodeo. It’s all about branding, plus I think that retailers are having a tough time getting shoppers into stores since online shopping has become everyones ‘easy out’.

As I was walking by Louis Vuitton’s windows I was initially drawn in by the new color combinations of some of the handbags, particularly the ones inspired by the paintings of Turner. The strong lavender-blue tone mixed with the hazy orange tones of Ancient Rome, really did it for me. As I continued to study the windows, I realized that the large white bunny in the entrance, as well as the handbag tags, were  an homage to Jeff Koons balloon animals that he’s so famous for.

Jeff Koons Ballon Rabbit, Eli Broad Collection
Jeff Koons Ballon Rabbit, Eli Broad Collection

And then… there are the LV’s and the JK’s on the handbags, as well as in the windows, another reference to the collaboration between these two iconic companies.  And lastly, there’s that big blue Christmas ball that isn’t a Christmas decoration at all, but rather an homage to his Gazing Ball Paintings.

Jeff Koons Gazing Ball Paintings, Gagosian Gallery
Jeff Koons Gazing Ball Paintings, Gagosian Gallery

Whether you love or hate the new handbags, the holiday windows on Rodeo Drive are a perfect exercise in restraint. They tell the story of the new collection and joint collaboration, while still looking festive from an uniformed point of view.  Bravo!

 

Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic feels like an Impressionist Painting

Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic Fan, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic Fan, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
'Contemplation' by Mary Cassatt, 1891 -92
‘Contemplation’ by Mary Cassatt, 1891 -92
Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic, 2017, Will Rogers State Park, Photo Romi Cortier
Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic, 2017, Will Rogers State Park, Photo Romi Cortier
Woman with a Parasol, Claude Monet, 1875
Woman with a Parasol, Claude Monet, 1875
Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic, 2017, Will Rogers State Park, Photo Romi Cortier
Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic, 2017, Will Rogers State Park, Photo Romi Cortier
'Racehorses' Edgar Degas, 1895, National Gallery of Canada
‘Racehorses’ Edgar Degas, 1895, National Gallery of Canada
Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic, 2017, Will Rogers State Park, Photo Romi Cortier
Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic, 2017, Will Rogers State Park, Photo Romi Cortier
Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grand Jatte, Georges Seurat, 1884-86, Art Institute of Chicago
Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grand Jatte, Georges Seurat, 1884-86, Art Institute of Chicago

I recently attended the Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic in Los Angeles. It was my first time attending this event, and my first time watching a polo match. The temperatures were pushing 90 on this very hot October day. In an attempt to stay cool, attendees  were huddled under a sea of orange Veuve Clicquot umbrella’s as far as the eye could see. We tried our best to purchase one, but they’d quickly sold out. Thank goodness for the complimentary orange fans and the faintest  summer  breeze.

As the day unfolded, I began to glimpse familiar visions of moments I’d seen before in museums, namely impressionist paintings.  It’s so odd to feel as if you’re living inside a painting, experiencing some sort of art deja vu. Impressionist paintings were inspired by everyday life, so why not this day? It was beautiful in every direction: polo ponies, orange umbrella’s, beautifully dressed people wearing the latest trends. To be honest, it was more fun watching the guests jockeying for photos ops at the branded photo stations, then it was actually watching the polo match.

However, as everyone stood for the National Anthem, I was both proud and humbled.  I was also reminded of George Seurat’s Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grand Jatte. The beautifully groomed jockeys on manicured polo ponies reminded me of Edgar Degas’s Racehorses. And when a sea of women took to the field  at half time  to stomp the divots… and of course take a few selfies, I was reminded of Claude Monet’s  Woman with a Parasol. It’s amazing how much life changes, and yet stays the same. Maybe we all dream the same dream. To see. To be seen. To make a difference. And to look absolutely fantastic while we do it.

A Hancock Park Halloween

Hancock Park Halloween, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween in Hancock Park, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
Hancock Park Halloween, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween in Hancock Park, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween in Hancock Park, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween in Hancock Park, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween in Hancock Park, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween in Hancock Park, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
Hancock Park Halloween, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween in Hancock Park , 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
A Hancock Park Halloween, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween in Hancock Park, 2017, Photo Romi Cortier

Halloween in Hancock Park is unlike anything you’ve ever seen. If you’re not familiar with Hancock Park, and neighboring Windsor Square,  it’s because it’s one of LA’s best kept secrets.

The affluent neighborhood was founded in the early 1920’s by developer – philanthropist George Allan Hancock, and includes roughly 1200 homes. The homes tend to be architecturally significant, sitting on palatial lots, frequently with guest homes and pools tucked behind them. And when it comes to Halloween, these magnificent homes are frequently decorated to the nines. Why? Because trick or treaters come flocking to these homes by the thousands… and I’m not exaggerating. I’ve seen it first hand year after year.

The magic starts at sundown, with the youngest goblins strolling in. As the moon rises in the night sky, the streets get more and more crowded. The lines outside each home can be 50 to 100 deep, with zombie cheerleaders, biker babies and little mermaids  filling their bags with some of the best candy south of Melrose avenue. One of my clients who lives in the neighborhood told me he spends on average of $500 a year, or more, on candy. With numbers like that, maybe I should be donning a mask and making the rounds too… kidding. Seriously tho, It’s so much fun to see so many happy faces making the rounds, awed by the Disney-esk mansions. Maybe someday when they’re older, they’ll come to truly appreciate theses grand  Mediterranean and Spanish Revival homes for their architecture… but for now, it’s all about the Candy.

Happy Halloween!!

The Art of Michael Muller & Sage Vaughn

'Hitch Hiker' Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Archival Paper, Micheal Muller & Sage Vaughn, Photo Romi Cortier
‘Hitch Hiker’ Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Archival Paper, Micheal Muller & Sage Vaughn, Photo Romi Cortier
'Attacker 1', Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Archival Photograph Paper, Michael Muller & Sage Vaughn, Photo Romi Cortier
‘Attacker 1’, Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Archival Photograph Paper, Michael Muller & Sage Vaughn, Photo Romi Cortier
Echo Chamber, Acrylic, Ink & Vellum on Archival Photograph Paper, Michael Muller & Sage Vaughn, Photo Romi Cortier
‘Echo Chamber’, Acrylic, Ink & Vellum on Archival Photograph Paper, Michael Muller & Sage Vaughn, Photo Romi Cortier
'Peeper', Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Archival Photograph Paper, Sage Vaughn & Micheal Muller, Photo Romi Cortier
‘Peeper’, Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Archival Photograph Paper,  Micheal Muller & Sage Vaughn, Photo Romi Cortier
'Garden Party Crasher', Acrylic, Ink, and Vellum on Archival Photograph Paper, Michael fuller & Sage Vaughn, Photo Romi Cortier
‘Garden Party Crasher’, Acrylic, Ink, and Vellum on Archival Photograph Paper, Michael fuller & Sage Vaughn, Photo Romi Cortier
'Attacker 2', Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Archival Photograph Paper, Michael Miller & Sage Vaughn, Photo Romi Cortier
‘Attacker 2’, Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Archival Photograph Paper, Michael Miller & Sage Vaughn, Photo Romi Cortier

I LOVED the recent art exhibition of Michael Muller and Sage Vaughn. I’ve been aware of Sage’s paintings for years, but I’ve never had the opportunity to see his work in person. This  recent exhibit featured Vaughn’s painting over the photographic images of Michael Muller.  Most images were 48″ x 60″ and some as large as 60″ x 90″, ranging in price from $16,000 – $22,000. I was elated to see so many red sold dots on the pieces.

Over the last decade Sage has had multiple solo shows, from New York to London to Germany and Geneva. There have also been several group exhibitions from Los Angeles to London, San Francisco  to Belgium… it’s safe to say, Sage is everywhere. I wish I would have known about his work a decade ago, as it might have been a bit more affordable. But that’s what drives prices up: the international solo shows and a list of top notch collectors.

Below are a few more images of Sage’s work from his web site www.sagevaughn.com.

I'm not Trying to Forget, Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Paper, Sage Vaughn, SageVaughn.com
I’m not Trying to Forget, Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Paper, Sage Vaughn, SageVaughn.com
The Gazer (R Prince) 2014, Oil, Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Canvas, Sage Vaughn, SageVaughn.com
The Gazer (R Prince) 2014, Oil, Acrylic, Ink and Vellum on Canvas, Sage Vaughn, SageVaughn.com

As an artist, I’ve been very enamored by Sage’s use of the Butterfly, combined with his drip paint technique. Below you can view a YouTube mural making video that I created in 2014 inspired directly by his paintings. I have no idea if he’s ever seen my work, but I do hope that he would be flattered and not offended by my interpretation of his beautiful fine art.

 

Upscale Halloween Table Ensemble 2017

Halloween Table Ensemble, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween Table Ensemble, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween Table Ensemble, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween Table Ensemble, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween Table Ensemble, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Vintage crystal bowl with silver trim, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween Table Ensemble, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween Table Ensemble, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Versace Wine Decanter, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Versace Wine Decanter, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween Table Ensemble with Skull Ornaments by Kurt Adler, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween Table Ensemble with Skull Ornaments by Kurt Adler, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween Table Ensemble, Bowl by Alessi, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween Table Ensemble, Bowl by Alessi, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Romi Cortier
Halloween Table Ensemble, DIY, Romi Cortier, Photo Recio Young
Halloween Table Ensemble, Artful Living with Romi Cortier, Photo Recio Young

Here’s some inspiration for your Halloween table ensemble, with an upscale vibe. I’ve been collecting gorgeous goodies for years, and it’s so fun to pull them out and mix and match them.

I started with a black brocade table cloth made from two yards of fabric from International Silks and Woolens at 8347 Beverly Blvd, LA, Ca. 90048. Next up I used a vintage Silver Tray from my mother’s estate, dating from the early 1970’s. I love this vintage tray and use if for all of my parties. It also makes a great serving tray for bottles of wine, or chilled bottles of sparking water.

I picked up the rectangular vase at GM floral for about $20, and filled it with roses from Trader Joes, cropping the stems to about 3 inches. On the foreground of the tray are two Skull Christmas ornaments by Kurt Adler, each retailing for $15. I also used 3 vintage Art Deco tumblers filled with tea lights from Ikea. And lastly on the tray are black sparkly butterflies also from GM Floral.

For a little height on the table I used two skull candle sticks by DL & Co., each about $90, with gold candlesticks from Target. I also used two Reed and Barton Martini glasses to serve colorful M&M’s and Candy Corn. Two other items on the table that I absolutely love, include  a Versace wine decanter with frosted medallions and a smashing bowl by Alessi known as the Cactus Bowl. I frequently use this bowl as a fruit bowl, however, with colorfully wrapped candy, it adds so much sparkle to the table (about $120).  The glass votives on the table I picked up at Marshall’s or TJMaxx for about $2 each.

The secret to this successful ensemble was mixing and matching items of the same color, either chrome or silver. By doing this, it allows all of the colors from the candies and flowers on the table to totally pop. Some items are certainly more upscale and expensive than others, but it’s the art of mixing and matching that make this Artful Living at its best.

 

A Design Diary by Romi Cortier